Rochester NY Stake Employment Center

February 17, 2012

LinkedIn Bible: Everything You Need to Know About the Social Network for Professionals

Filed under: Social Media — Larry @ 2:46 pm

http://www.cio.com/article/495098/LinkedIn_Bible_Everything_You_Need_to_Know_About_the_Social_Network_for_Professionals?page=1&taxonomyId=3004

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January 25, 2012

10 Buzzwords to Take Off Your LinkedIn Profile Now

Filed under: Social Media — Larry @ 1:01 pm

By KATY STEINMETZ December 13, 2011

Summary (for full article and the ‘why’ each word should be removed, see http://newsfeed.time.com/2011/12/13/ten-buzzwords-to-take-off-your-linkedin-profile-now/ )

LinkedIn, the social-networking site for people with business cards, has released its list of the year’s most overused professional buzzwords, culled from the profiles of its 135 million members. As one might expect, they’re terms that sound awfully nice but say almost nothing specific about a person. They’re the type of terms that are roughly the equivalent of listing “showing up to work” in your skills section.

#10 = dynamic
#9 = communication skills
#8 = problem solving
#7 = Innovative
#6 = motivated
#5 = Track record
#4 = extensive experience
#3 = effective
#2 = organizational

And the No. one most overused professional buzzword is creative. This attribute, like many of the others, is one that is better shown than told. As LinkedIn’s connection director put it in a release, “Use language that illustrates your unique professional accomplishments and experiences. Give concrete examples of results you’ve achieved whenever possible and reference attributes that are specific to you.” And please, never use the word synergy without your tongue firmly pressed into your cheek.

December 3, 2011

Social media can kill your career — but not the way you think

Filed under: Social Media — Larry @ 11:40 am

Why to avoid being overexposed in a digital world

Social media has become the norm, both as a part of everyday life and as an integral part of your success or failure during your job search. You hear all the time about how to utilize social media as an essential part of your job search or about social media as one of the many ways you can get fired — or not hired.

Usually when we talk about social media as a firing or non-hiring mechanism, it’s in the context of your digital footprint: not posting inappropriate photos, racial slurs or nasty comments about your boss and colleagues, for example.
But now there’s a new piece of the puzzle to consider: if an employer sees that you’re overly active on social media — they might question your professional commitment.

If you are very active on social media an employer should question how your online activity is contributing to the company’s mission and achievement of your individual goals. An employer would certainly ask what is not getting done by you spending so much time socializing on social media sites.
There is the possibility that your social media activity is being mistaken for personal use when really, you’re using it for professional reasons. If that’s the case and you’re still lucky enough to get an interview, address the issue verbally.

You might indicate that you were in active job seeking mode – presuming the overexposure was in terms of frequency, not questionable content.
So what’s the happy medium between being visible on social media but not so much that it ruins your chances at finding a new job?
Most employers are looking at social media sites to find qualified job candidates. Your goal is to be visible for networking purposes and to have a professional and personal profile that is up-to-date and descriptive enough for someone to make an preliminary screening of your suitability for a potential opportunity.

Having at least a Facebook and/or Twitter profile on the Web will do the trick — you just have to be cautious about your privacy settings. Just be smart about what is posted and customize your privacy settings. Good rule of thumb, don’t post anything on the Internet that you might regret later.

Here are six tips to avoid social media overkill and manage your online presence effectively:

1. Add to the conversation

"Use LinkedIn to post your résumé online, contribute to industry- and occupation-specific discussions," Neece says.

2. Have more than one account

Have two social media accounts. One that is geared toward your desired industry so employers can see that you’re attempting to be active and another one for personal use. Be sure to protect your profiles so they aren’t accessible to the public.

3. Score face time

Use online resources to get face-to-face or voice-to-voice with another person. Each of us is most memorable and most influential in-person.

4. Just say no

If your social media profiles are protected and a potential employer requests to follow you, don’t feel obligated to accept. That’s what your other ‘professional’ account is for.

5. Stay positive

Don’t bad mouth any of the companies that you’re applying to, especially if you feel the interview didn’t go well. If you put something on the Internet, it’s out there for anyone to see.

6. Keep things to yourself

Don’t publicize that you’re going to an interview or just finished an interview at a company. Some companies do not like to have their recruiting process — or that they’re even having one — publicized.

– MONROE COUNTY DHS Weekly Employment Bulletin March 21, 2011

How to Scrub Your Facebook Profile for a Job Search

Filed under: Social Media — Larry @ 11:35 am

Before you embark on a job search, one of the first things you could do is check your social networking pages for any incriminating evidence of slacker-dom (or otherwise undesirable features). Facebook and MySpace, for starters, have been the source of many heartaches for young job seekers unaware that potential employers were using these sites to research candidates.

1. Remove any religious and/or political affiliations. As sad as it is, employers might subconsciously discriminate against you if they see something that doesn’t agree with them. Be sure to make sure you aren’t a member of any sketchy groups or a fan of any pages that you wouldn’t want a future boss to see.

2. Look through your photos to make sure there aren’t any crazy party pics or other images that could cast you in a negative light. If you’re over 21, it’s okay to have a drink in hand…but please, no photos of you doing a keg stand. Same goes for photos of a "sexually charged" nature-no photos of you making out with or getting freaky with members of the same or opposite sex. Keep it clean, y’all.

3. It’s a good idea to remove your birth year. Again, employers shouldn’t discriminate because of age, but they might.

4. Check your wall posts and make sure you aren’t having any questionable conversations with friends. And if you have friends who often post scandalous messages on your wall, you might want to turn this feature off until your job offer is in hand.

5. Nix the juvenile applications. It’s fine to participate in some, but make sure you aren’t passing beers around to all your friends and showing which style of underwear you are. Facebook users will know what I’m talking about.

6. Make sure your profile pic makes a good first impression. It doesn’t have to be a professionally done headshot, but keep it in good taste. You might also think about using one that shows a hobby or a bit of your personality. For example, if you’re a fisherman, you might show a photo of you with your latest catch. Oftentimes, this will make you stand out in employers’ minds.

Tips & Warnings
Some will argue that you should set your Facebook/MySpace profiles to private when searching for jobs…and this is definitely an option. However, these tools can work to your advantage and help you to create a "personal brand" if managed properly. They can also help you uncover job opportunities when local folks and friends of friends check out your page. Social networking sites are especially useful for those in more creative or web-oriented fields. In fact, I’ve even heard of some employers passing on candidates who don’t participate.

– MONROE COUNTY DHS Weekly Employment Bulletin March 28, 2011

October 24, 2011

Can Facebook really help you land a job?

Filed under: Social Media — Larry @ 1:56 pm

While Facebook can sometimes seem like a way to simply post a few photos or let your friends know about your birthday — there are ways it can come in handy in your professional career. Facebook lets job seekers tap an informal network of friends or friends of friends who can be instrumental in creating success. "The collection of friends you have through Facebook are the ones most likely to have your back," says Jenny Foss, a job search expert who blogs at JobJenny.com. With so many different options, Facebook is a good place to start if you’re job hunting or just seeking to network.

Here’s what to do to get started:

Customize your avatar

In an online search, your avatar is typically the first thing a potential employer sees on Facebook. So if you’re in job search mode, it’s important to have a professional avatar that can help you get hired. "You can create a custom avatar that includes your contact information and that you are in the job market," says Jessica Miller-Merrell, chief executive of Xceptional HR. Additionally, while your profile should be kept private, include an e-mail address and job history in the visible information so recruiters can reach out to you directly.

Use your status

Find a good way to let your Facebook friends you’re looking. For example, refer them to your own site, which showcases samples of your work and a résumé, or ask them to drop you an e-mail if they know of a lead. Being specific about what type of job or company you’re looking for can make it easier for people to help, Foss says. Throughout your job search use your status to update your friends on how it’s going. Don’t inundate friends with every little detail and make each status conversational and optimistic. "Keep it genuine, make it real," Foss says. "But don’t come across as the saddest, most desperate person alive."

Take out a Facebook ad

When Marian Schembari graduated from college and wanted to land a publishing job, she took out an ad on Facebook to target publishing houses. The ad showed up for Facebook users who listed companies like Random House and HarperCollins as their employer. Once they clicked on the ad, users were referred to her personal website that contained her résumé. A person from each of the publishers e-mailed that he or she passed on her résumé to HR or wanted to meet, she recalls.

After placing her ad, others in the industry wrote about Schembari’s pursuits and she was able to get her foot into the publishing world. "Facebook was the easiest and fastest way to network with a huge number of publishing people at once," she says. "It was like a networking event on steroids with an added bonus of never needing to leave my house or get out of my pajamas."

"Like" companies where you’d want to work

Since most companies have a Facebook presence these days, clicking the "like" button on that company’s fan page will signal that you’re interested in a job there, Foss says. Additionally, it’s a simple way to learn the latest company news, which can help during an interview. Additionally, "some companies list their open jobs right on their [Facebook] pages," she says.

Keep it real

Since Facebook is a less formal network, people expect to see a more casual part of your personality so there’s no need for a professional tone, points out Craig Fischer, vice president of sales at Ajax Social Media. "I have hired many people through Facebook," he says. "Many of my customers and job candidates are people who I network with [on] there."

MONROE COUNTY DHS Weekly Employment Bulletin – August 1, 2011

Why Your Picture Needs to be on Your LinkedIn Profile

Filed under: Social Media — Larry @ 10:00 am

http://johnpalcisko.com/?p=14

Summary quotes from the article:

“LinkedIn experts say that 100 percent COMPLETE is JUST the starting point to a strong profile”

“According to LinkedIn, you are 40 percent more likely to be found in a LinkedIn search with a 100 percent completed profile as opposed to one that is not completely finished.”

“People like to put a face with a name”

The Ultimate Cheat Sheet for Mastering LinkedIn

Filed under: Social Media — Larry @ 9:52 am

http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/23454/The-Ultimate-Cheat-Sheet-for-Mastering-LinkedIn.aspx

“While Facebook, Twitter, and now Google+ have been generating the most buzz lately in the social media world, LinkedIn is a powerful platform that often gets underutilized or put on the back burner.

The truth is, LinkedIn can be extremely useful — especially when you’re aware of all the little hidden tricks that don’t get nearly enough exposure as they deserve. To help you master LinkedIn, below is our ultimate list of 20 awesome tricks you’ve likely overlooked.”

How To Connect With An Employer Via Linkedin

Filed under: Social Media — Larry @ 9:31 am

http://msn.careerbuilder.com/Article/MSN-2689-Job-Search-How-to-connect-with-an-employer-via-Linked-In/?SiteId=cbmsnhp42689&sc_extcmp=JS_2689_home1&gt1=23000

There are some useful guidelines in this article about to help you use LinkedIn effectively to connect with potential employers. The points they address in the article are:

When reaching out to your contacts:

·   Don’t be shy

·   Don’t be needy

·   Take it off-line

When making introduction requests:

·   Let your contact know it’s coming

·   Make a good first impression

When researching companies

·   Find the hiring manager

·   Look at whom they hire

June 13, 2011

Can Facebook really help you land a job?

Filed under: Social Media — Larry @ 9:17 pm

While Facebook can sometimes seem like a way to simply post a few photos or let your friends know about your birthday — there are ways it can come in handy in your professional career. Facebook lets job seekers tap an informal network of friends or friends of friends who can be instrumental in creating success. "The collection of friends you have through Facebook are the ones most likely to have your back," says Jenny Foss, a job search expert who blogs at JobJenny.com. With so many different options, Facebook is a good place to start if you’re job hunting or just seeking to network.

Here’s what to do to get started:

Customize your avatar

In an online search, your avatar is typically the first thing a potential employer sees on Facebook. So if you’re in job search mode, it’s important to have a professional avatar that can help you get hired. "You can create a custom avatar that includes your contact information and that you are in the job market," says Jessica Miller-Merrell, chief executive of Xceptional HR. Additionally, while your profile should be kept private, include an e-mail address and job history in the visible information so recruiters can reach out to you directly.

Use your status

Find a good way to let your Facebook friends you’re looking. For example, refer them to your own site, which showcases samples of your work and a résumé, or ask them to drop you an e-mail if they know of a lead. Being specific about what type of job or company you’re looking for can make it easier for people to help, Foss says. Throughout your job search use your status to update your friends on how it’s going. Don’t inundate friends with every little detail and make each status conversational and optimistic. "Keep it genuine, make it real," Foss says. "But don’t come across as the saddest, most desperate person alive."

Take out a Facebook ad

When Marian Schembari graduated from college and wanted to land a publishing job, she took out an ad on Facebook to target publishing houses. The ad showed up for Facebook users who listed companies like Random House and HarperCollins as their employer. Once they clicked on the ad, users were referred to her personal website that contained her résumé. A person from each of the publishers e-mailed that he or she passed on her résumé to HR or wanted to meet, she recalls.

After placing her ad, others in the industry wrote about Schembari’s pursuits and she was able to get her foot into the publishing world. "Facebook was the easiest and fastest way to network with a huge number of publishing people at once," she says. "It was like a networking event on steroids with an added bonus of never needing to leave my house or get out of my pajamas."

"Like" companies where you’d want to work

Since most companies have a Facebook presence these days, clicking the "like" button on that company’s fan page will signal that you’re interested in a job there, Foss says. Additionally, it’s a simple way to learn the latest company news, which can help during an interview. Additionally, "some companies list their open jobs right on their [Facebook] pages," she says.

Keep it real

Since Facebook is a less formal network, people expect to see a more casual part of your personality so there’s no need for a professional tone, points out Craig Fischer, vice president of sales at Ajax Social Media. "I have hired many people through Facebook," he says. "Many of my customers and job candidates are people who I network with [on] there."

From MONROE COUNTY DHS Weekly Employment Bulletin – 02May2011

April 12, 2011

Do Companies check Google, Facebook, Myspace, Twitter or Blogs before hiring?

Filed under: Social Media — Larry @ 9:07 am


YES!!!! 75 percent of U.S. recruiters and human resources professionals say their bosses require them to research job applicants online. More importantly, 70 percent report that they have rejected candidates after such sleuthing.

Whether it is ethical or not to base a hiring decision on a job candidate’s Facebook, Myspace or other social media page, it happens every day by all types of employers.

Recent Scenario: A manager at a consulting firm was hiring for a senior analyst position. She had narrowed the field to two candidates, R.D. & P.J and needed to must make her final recommendation to the company’s human resources department immediately. Both candidates graduated from the same highly ranked business school that she had. Both had also boasted appropriate work backgrounds and shone in their interviews.

However, R.D. was first in line for the job because of his leadership skills, reputation for tireless energy and great communication skills. Before making her final decision, the manager decided to Google both candidates.

Her initial search revealed that R.D. was involved in nonprofit work and had won community service awards. She was impressed. But then she landed on his friend’s Facebook page.

On one Facebook page she found an album of pictures showing R.D. drinking, smoking cigarettes and – in his words – “smokin’ blunts” with college fraternity brothers. The page belonged to R.D.’s friend, who had not enabled his privacy settings.

She then Googled the other finalist, P.J. and found only work-related sites that listed her as an effective project manager.

R.D.’s online photos caused the manager to rethink her choice and to grapple with the slippery boundaries between public and private life.

THE RESOLUTION: The manager concluded that R.D. would not fit in with the company’s professional work environment and her team. She could not waste time or money on hiring the wrong person. Yet she wondered whether she arrived at her decision fairly. After all, R.D. had not offered the information willingly, and he had set the appropriate privacy settings on his own Facebook page. Also, the manager had not disclosed that she would conduct a background check online.

THE LESSON: Be careful what you post…
Many people do not realize the extent to which their friends and associates could harm their online reputations. For example, friends who post and tag photos with their name and online identity on Facebook and elsewhere may have much more open privacy settings. Whatever is publicly accessible becomes public information, no matter who uploads it. It is more efficient for HR professionals to conduct online searches than to conduct reference checks, so this is a growing dilemma for companies.

Before posting information and photographs on Facebook, remember that in the virtual world, our houses are made of glass. Every piece of data is permanent and stored in a digital archive. More than half of employers cite provocative photographs as the biggest factor in the decision not to hire.

From Job Search Companion March 2011

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